Is There Rain Fade on 60GHz Wireless Signals?

Many new wireless wire and wireless wire dish customers who are unfamiliar with 60GHz have been asking about rain fade and if it’s a major problem on 60GHz.  So let’s look at the facts.

At 60GHz the biggest problem is actually attenuation from Oxygen.  The O2 molecules in the air absorb the RF energy very efficiently at this frequency.  Therefore link distances tend to be much shorter than hoped for if purely considering Free Space Path Loss.  The losses at 60GHz equate to around an extra 15dB per Km over and above any FSPL.  So what about rain, fog, sleet, snow, mist etc?
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Can I use 60GHz for PtP or PtMP links in the UK ?

Wireless Wire Dish

The arrival earlier this year of the MikroTik Wireless Wire and shortly after the MikroTik Wireless Wire Dish caused a large amount of excitement in the WISP industry and sales have proven them to be very popular products.  The use of 60GHz instead of 5GHz for point to point and point to multi-point links opens many new possibilities and challenges.

60GHz offers substantially less interference and much higher throughput speeds. Less interference because the band is almost completely unoccupied, uses very narrow radio antenna beams therefore offers much higher co-located frequency re-use. Also much higher throughput is possible up to as high as 1Gbps Full Duplex.
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Wi-Fi Protected Access 3 – WPA3

Back in January 2018, the Wi-Fi Alliance announced in their Press Release that a new Wi-Fi Protected Access®  (aka WPA) certification program had been launched. First there was WPA™, then there was WPA2™, unsurprisingly therefore the new system was called WPA3™. (Note that WPA, WPA2 and WPA3 are not ‘standards’, nor are they ‘protocols’, they are ‘Wi-Fi Alliance certification programs‘. In fact, the standard for WPA2 was actually 802.11i).
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Which MikroTik RouterOS package channel should I use ?

We are often asked about the different versions of MikroTik RouterOS, and thought we would clarify when each should be used.

MikroTik RouterOS System Packages – Check For Updates

When you go to click the “Check for updates” button in System -> Packages in any recent versions of RouterOS, you are presented with a set of choices in the channel dropdown:
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News: MikroTik and Ubiquiti fix WPA2 Client Vulnerability

For those unfamiliar with this latest WPA2 Security Vulnerability, please bear in mind the problem is on the client device, not the AP. Therefore rushing to patch your APs is not going to solve all the problems in your network from this vulnerability!

Of course, if you’re using WPA-TKIP (or using ‘both’ TKIP and AES), you DO have more problems than this attack. Therefore please ensure that any support for TKIP is disabled!  If you’re using WEP, this vulnerability will not affect you, but then again, you have even bigger problems anyway!
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News: MikroTik PowerBox Pro Gigabit Outdoor PoE

We now have stock of the MikroTik PowerBox Pro

The MikroTik PowerBox Pro is an outdoor five Gigabit Ethernet port router with PoE output on four ports. The PowerBox Pro features a sleek outdoor enclosure, making it suitable for various types of installations such as radio towers.

The PowerBox also supports passive or standard 802.3at/af PoE input/output. Ethernet ports 2-5 can power PoE capable devices with the same voltage as the unit is supplied with, making for a cleaner install. It can power 802.3at and af mode B compatible devices, if 48-57V input is used. The MikroTik PowerBox Pro has an SFP port for a fiber connectivity, it is small, affordable and easy to use. But at the same time comes with a powerful 800MHz CPU, capable of all the advanced configurations that RouterOS supports.

News: MikroTik release RouterOS 6.38.7 (bugfix tree)

MikroTik have a new release in the bugfix tree.
https://mikrotik.com/download

What’s new in 6.38.7 (2017-Jun-20 10:55):

!) bridge – fixed BPDU rx/tx when “protocol-mode=none”;
!) bridge – reverted bridge BPDU processing back to pre-v6.38 behaviour (v6.40 will have another separate VLAN-aware bridge implementation);
*) 6to4 – fixed wrong IPv6 “link-local” address generation;
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MikroTik release RouterOS 6.36

MikroTik have released 6.36 in the current release channel. Here is their changelog:

What’s new in 6.36 (2016-Jul-20 14:09):

*) arm – added Dude server support;
*) dude – (changes discussed here: http://forum.mikrotik.com/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=110428);
*) dude – server package is now made smaller. client side content upgrade is now removed from it and is downloaded straight from our cloud. So workstations on which client is used will require access to wan. Alternatively upgrade must be done by reinstalling the client on each new release;
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HowTo: MikroTik Secure VPN Part 1.5 MikroTik to MikroTik with IPSec

This is a short HowTo which will cover the set-up of Mikrotik to Mikrotik VPN but secured with IPsec. The use of IPsec can be very CPU intensive and it is recommended that the VPN server be set up on a Mikrotik which supports hardware based AES/IPsec encryption such as the Mikrotik RB850Gx2RB3011 or any CCR series router.

I will be using a RB850Gx2 as my VPN server and a Mikrotik mAP as my VPN clients, all the heavy IPsec processing will be done on the RB850Gx2 which has AES hardware for offloading IPsec calculations. ROS 6.33.3 or higher on the client side is required in order to make use of the ‘easy IPsec connect’ feature.
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HowTo: Optimising MikroTik Firewall rules

When creating complex firewall rules on MikroTik routers, especially those with high levels of packet throughput, it is important that any rules are processed in an efficient manner. Firewall rules are processed top down. Every new packet is tested against each rule until a match is found. For high packet count traffic, this could mean that all those packets are having to be processed many times before it is matched. This can require a higher processing power than necessary and if the CPU reaches 100%, packet loss will occur.
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